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E-newsflash: Archives

  • New material could save time and money in medical imaging

    Chemists at The University of Texas at Austin have developed a material that holds the key to cheap, fast and portable new sensors for a wide range of chemicals that right now cost government and industries large sums to...

    (Issue date: 22 May 2017)
  • "Smart contact lens sensor" for diabetic and glaucoma diagnosis

    A recent study, affiliated with UNIST has proposed the possibility of in situ human health monitoring simply by wearing a contact lens with built-in wireless smart sensors. This study has been jointly conducted by Professor...

    (Issue date: 22 May 2017)
  • First synthetic retina

    A synthetic, soft tissue retina developed by an Oxford University student could offer fresh hope to visually impaired people. Until now, all artificial retinal research has used only rigid, hard materials. The new research, by...

    (Issue date: 22 May 2017)
  • New microscopic technique could help detect, diagnose metastatic melanomas

    The fight against skin cancer just got a new weapon. For years, melanoma researchers have studied samples that were considered uniform in size and colour, making them easier to examine by more conventional means. But melanomas...

    (Issue date: 22 May 2017)
  • Optical spectroscopy improves predictive assessment of kidney function

    A new technique developed by researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Lab promises to improve accuracy and lower costs of real-time assessment of kidney function, reports an article published this week by SPIE, the ...

    (Issue date: 22 May 2017)
  • New fibre optic probe brings endoscopic diagnosis of cancer closer to the clinic

    In an important step toward endoscopic diagnosis of cancer, researchers have developed a handheld fibre optic probe that can be used to perform multiple nonlinear imaging techniques without the need for tissue staining. The...

    (Issue date: 03 May 2017)
  • Diabetes App forecasts blood sugar levels

    Columbia University researchers have developed a personalized algorithm that predicts the impact of particular foods on an individual's blood sugar levels. The algorithm has been integrated into an app, Glucoracle, that will...

    (Issue date: 03 May 2017)
  • Follow-up colonoscopies associated with a significantly lower incidence of bowel cancer

    Patients at risk of developing bowel cancer can significantly benefit from a follow-up colonoscopy. Currently, everyone in the UK over the age of 60 is invited to be screened for bowel cancer, also known as colorectal cancer....

    (Issue date: 03 May 2017)
  • Improved survival in elderly patients with early-stage oesophageal cancer

    Elderly patients with early-stage oesophageal cancer that received treatment had an increased 5-year overall survival when compared to patients who received observation with no treatment. Oesophageal cancer is the eighth most...

    (Issue date: 03 May 2017)
  • Treatment for severe bleeding could save lives of mothers around the world

    New evidence suggests low-cost drug should become frontline response for major blood loss after childbirth.

    An inexpensive and widely available drug could save the lives of one in three mothers who would otherwise bleed to death...

    (Issue date: 03 May 2017)
  • Immune discovery points to stroke therapy

    Having a stroke damages immune cells as well as affecting the brain, research has found. The findings help explain why patients have a greater risk of catching life-threatening infections, such as pneumonia, after having a...

    (Issue date: 24 April 2017)
  • Research uncovers life-saving benefits in the battle against viruses

    At-risk patients, such as those with HIV or transplant recipients, could benefit from potentially life-saving study carried out by a University of Surrey led group of international researchers. The research, led by Professor...

    (Issue date: 24 April 2017)
  • New consensus statement for treatment of empyema

    Although treatable, empyema is a potentially deadly accumulation of pus around the lungs, occurring most commonly as a complication of pneumonia. To better manage this disease in the face of rising demand for treatment, the...

    (Issue date: 24 April 2017)
  • Medical history reveals multiple sclerosis begins to impact patients sooner

    People with multiple sclerosis can show signs of something wrong five years before the onset of disease, much earlier than previously thought, according to a new analysis of health records from people with the condition. The...

    (Issue date: 24 April 2017)
  • Early hip fracture surgery will save hundreds of lives

    Researchers in Bristol found 8percent more patients died after 30 days if they were operated on between 24 and 36 hours after admission to hospital. The delay is thought to have caused 670 excess deaths in four years. Project...

    (Issue date: 24 April 2017)
  • Some women can stop taking blood thinners for unexplained vein clots

    A Canadian-led research group has developed and validated a rule that could let half of women with unexplained vein blood clots stop taking blood thinners for life. Over 1.5 million Canadians will experience a vein blood clot...

    (Issue date: 13 April 2017)
  • Majority of incontinence treatments deliver poor results

    Surgery is the most reliable method of treatment for incontinence - curing the condition in just over eight in ten cases; other types of treatment, meanwhile, do not deliver the same kind of success. These are the findings of...

    (Issue date: 13 April 2017)
  • Docs can pick your nose

    The range of options for medicating emergency patients intranasally has greatly expanded in recent years and can even be preferable for certain patients, including children, according to the results of a paper published...

    (Issue date: 13 April 2017)
  • Method may help myeloma patients avoid painful biopsies

    Multiple myeloma is a cancer of the plasma cells, which are white blood cells produced in bone marrow that churn out antibodies to help fight infection. When plasma cells become cancerous, they produce abnormal proteins, and...

    (Issue date: 13 April 2017)
  • Ultrasound and microbubbles flag malignant cancer in humans

    A team led by researchers from the Stanford University School of Medicine has demonstrated a way to diagnose cancer without resorting to surgery, raising the possibility of far fewer biopsies.

    For this first-in-humans clinical...

    (Issue date: 13 April 2017)
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